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Downtown Denver Non-Residential Projects: June 2016 Update

Yesterday we posted our Downtown Denver Residential Projects June 2016 Update, a semi-annual summary of new housing in the city’s urban core since the start of 2010. Today we take a look at all non-residential projects—office, hotel, civic, and other uses—that are completed, under construction, or proposed. Like our housing analysis, we use a 1.5-mile radius of the historic D&F tower at 16th and Arapahoe as our Downtown survey area for this summary. For our previous assessment, see our December 2015 Non-Residential Projects Update post.

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New 1144 Fifteenth office tower under construction in Downtown Denver, June 2016.

Click on the image to view our June 2016 Downtown Denver Non-Residential Projects exhibit or view/download a high-resolution PDF version (6 MB) formatted for printing at 11″ x 17″.

Office: The only office building completed during the past six months within our Downtown survey area was the 40,000 sf Industry Phase 3 project in River North, bringing the total square footage of office space completed since the start of 2010 to 1,933,000. However, two big projects started construction since our last update: the 430,000 sf 16 Chestnut building and the 210,000 sf Riverview at 1700 Platte project. With the other projects already in progress, that puts the total amount of new office space currently under construction in Downtown Denver at 2,053,000 sf. After all office projects currently underway are completed, about 4 million square feet of space—a significant amount in any real estate cycle—will be added to the Downtown market since 2010. In looking at the office projects still in the Proposed category, it’s likely that four of them totaling around 200,000 sf (1510 Market, 1615 Platte, Market Station, and SugarSquare) will break ground before the end of 2016.

Hotel: Downtown Denver’s hotel market continues to thrive in light of record-setting attendance at the Colorado Convention Center and the Mile High City’s emergence as an urban tourism destination in its own right. The number of new hotel rooms added to the Downtown market since 2010 stands at 1,776 and the completion of the 1,128 rooms currently under construction will put the number of hotel rooms in Downtown Denver over the 10,000 mark. Since our last update, three more hotel projects were announced (1701 Blake, 1600 Market, and 2525 16th Street) bringing the number of proposed new hotel rooms in the city center to 908.

Civic/Other: Compared to the office, hotel, and multi-family residential markets, the number of new projects falling under our Civic/Other category (uses such as cultural, educational, governmental, etc.) is fairly minimal. Currently, only two projects (Kirkland Museum and MSU Aerospace Engineering) are under construction, and only one project (CU Denver Wellness Center) is proposed and is scheduled to get underway this fall. But the few new entries in this category reflect not a lack of investment in this area but more the fact that we just finished a massive civic-projects building boom; just look at the Completed list.

Like our Multi-family Residential analysis, we added a Floor column to our exhibit this time. Here’s a bar chart showing the distribution of projects by the number of above-grade floors:

2016-06-29_chart

Interestingly, the results are almost identical to our multi-family residential assessment. Half (33 of 66) of the projects are buildings 5 stories or less, about one quarter (16 projects) are in the 6-10 floor range, and around one quarter (17 projects) are buildings 11 floors or taller. Huh.

Just for fun, let’s look at all projects together—multi-family residential, office, hotel, and civic/other—to get an overall sense of the scale of new developments in the Downtown area since the start of the decade. The figures below are not just the merger of the data used to produce the bar chart above and in yesterday’s residential update. In order to avoid double-counting several mixed-use projects such as 16M, which includes both residential and office uses in one structure, I had to filter out the duplicates to come up with a list of unique buildings/projects. Also, as we did yesterday, townhome projects were eliminated from the residential data set. Anyway, here’s the frequency distribution table followed by a bar chart:

2016-06-29_frequency-distribution-table

2016-06-29_frequency-distribution-chart

So far, 117 different projects have been completed or are under construction within the Downtown area in the past few years. That’s a lot of “urban fabric repair” going on! Of those, 23 are buildings greater than 10 stories high. And while our baseline for tracking these project is January 2010, in reality, the overwhelming majority of these projects have occurred since 2012 when the Denver economy came roaring out of the recession.

That’s it for our June 2016 summaries! You can access all of our semi-annual summaries on one page using the “Development Summary” graphic link on the right sidebar.


Downtown Denver Non-Residential Projects: December 2015 Update

Yesterday we published our December 2015 Multi-Family Residential Projects update for Downtown Denver, now let’s take a look at the scope of non-residential development, i.e. office, hotel, and civic/institutional uses, over the past six months. Like our residential analysis, we use a 1.5-mile radius of the historic D&F clock tower at 16th and Arapahoe as our Downtown survey area. Use this link to view our June 2015 Non-Residential Projects Update post.

The historic D&F clock tower at 16th and Arapahoe in among Downtown Denver's high-rises, April 2015.

The historic D&F clock tower at 16th and Arapahoe in among Downtown Denver’s high-rises, April 2015.

Click on the image below to view in full size our December 2015 Downtown Denver Non-Residential Projects exhibit or use this link (Downtown-Denver-Non-Residential-Projects-Summary-December-2015) to view/download a high-resolution PDF version (6 MB) formatted for printing at 11″ x 17″.

2015-12-29_Downtown-Denver-NonResidential-Projects-Summary-December-2015

Office: Since our June 2015 summary, two office buildings, 1601 Wewatta and the Triangle Building, have been completed, bringing the total square footage of office space completed in our survey area since the start of the decade to nearly two million square feet (1,933,000). The amount of new office space currently under construction is 1,453,000 square feet, a decrease since June due mostly to the completion of the aforementioned projects, but two new office developments are new to the Under Construction list: 999 17th Street and the Colorado Health Foundation headquarters. Regarding 999 17th Street, as we mentioned in our post on the project a few weeks ago, preliminary site work is underway but a formal project announcement has not yet been made; however, for the purposes of this summary, we are categorizing the project as being under construction. Proposed new office space has stayed largely the same at a little over 1 million square feet (1,180,000) but with one notable difference: since June, East West Partners announced an anchor tenant (DaVita) for their 16 Chestnut project allowing that project to definitively move forward in 2016. One major new office tower is in the pipeline… more on that soon.

Hotel: Downtown Denver’s hotel market continues to thrive. Since June, an additional 346 rooms were completed (Hyatt Place/Hyatt House) bringing the total number of new hotel rooms added to the Downtown market since the start of the decade to 1,776. The number of hotel rooms under construction increased since June to 1,128. While the Hyatt project moved to the completed column, a new hotel development with more rooms, the Le Meridien/AC Hotel, started construction. The list of proposed hotel projects has now been narrowed down to two totaling 319 rooms. Several new hotels, however, are in the pipeline. More on those projects in early 2016.

Civic/Other: In the Civic/Other category, which includes cultural, educational, and other institutional projects, the numbers have mostly stayed the same since our June update. No new projects were added to the Proposed category and one small but important project, the Kirkland Museum, started construction. Overall since the start of the decade, 3,521,000 square feet of Civic/Other projects have been completed.

That’s it for our December 2015 recap. For similar assessments that use a slightly different geographic approach, please check out the excellent development summary reports at the Downtown Denver Partnership. Our next comprehensive update will be in June 2016.


Golden Triangle: Kirkland Museum Update #2

Denver’s Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art is now under construction in the Golden Triangle Museum District!

DenverInfill stopped by the site at 12th and Bannock last weekend to check out the beginning of construction activities. A groundbreaking ceremony was held back in September. For more information on this exciting project, please check our Update #1 post or visit the Kirkland’s project web page.

Here’s the latest rendering, courtesy of the Kirkland Museum:

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Rendering of the new Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art, 12th & Bannock, opening 2017—including Vance Kirkland’s original studio (at right). Elevation looking southwest on Bannock Street by Olson Kundig.

This first photo shows the Bannock and 12th Avenue corner where work on the new Kirkland Museum is underway. The tower crane in the background is for the Eviva Cherokee apartment tower on the other side of the block.

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Taking a peek behind the fence we see that excavation work is just getting started:

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We’ll keep you posted as construction continues through 2016. The new Kirkland Museum is scheduled for completion in 2017.


Downtown Denver Non-Residential Projects: June 2015 Update

Earlier this month we took a look at the dozens of multi-family residential projects developed in Downtown Denver since 2010. Today, we are focusing on Downtown’s non-residential development projects—that is, office, hotel, civic, and institutional uses—during the same time period. We did something similar in September 2014, but that was for office projects only.

1144 15th Street (left) and 1401 Lawrence (right) office developments. Image courtesy of DenverInfill reader Elizabeth W.

1144 Fifteenth Street (left) and 1401 Lawrence (right) office developments. Image courtesy of DenverInfill reader Elizabeth W.

As with our recent residential analysis, projects included are those within a 1.5-mile radius of the historic D&F Tower at 16th and Arapahoe, which works well as a geographic center for the Downtown area. Click on the image below to view in full size our June 2015 Downtown Denver Non-Residential Projects map and table. Use this link to view/download a high-resolution PDF version (6 MB) formatted for printing at 11″ x 17″.

Downtown-Denver-NonResidential-Development-Summary-June-2015

Please note: The gross square footage figures listed are approximate. All projects are new construction with the exception of the Crawford Hotel at Denver Union Station and the Marriott Renaissance Hotel at the Colorado National Bank building. These two adaptive reuse projects were included to provide a more complete look at the Downtown hotel development market.

Office: Since 2010, approximately 3.2 million square feet of office space has been completed or is currently under construction in Downtown Denver. That represents roughly a 10% increase in the total Central Business District office inventory. The number of publicly announced Downtown office projects that have not yet broken ground is now down to just a handful. This is probably a good thing, as it makes sense to see how quickly the nearly 2 million square feet of space currently under development is absorbed. Fortunately, there are a lot of positive factors driving demand for office space in Downtown these days, such as the increasing number of firms who recognize their employees want great access to transit and an engaging, walkable work environment.

Hotel: 1,430 new hotel rooms have been added since 2010 with another 983 currently under construction. All of these, with the exception of the Fairfield Inn Lower Highland, are in the core Downtown area within easy walking distance of the Colorado Convention Center and/or RTD’s free MallRide or MetroRide. If and when the two hotels in the Proposed category are completed, they will put the number of hotel rooms in the Downtown core over 10,000 for the first time. Meanwhile, tourism numbers for Denver are setting records, business is booming at the Colorado Convention Center, and Downtown hotel occupancy rates are very strong.

Civic/Other: The public and institutional sectors have been busy investing in Downtown Denver, with over 3 million square feet of space added through numerous civic buildings, museums, and educational and health facilities.

The Proposed section for all three use categories is limited to those projects we’ve covered already on DenverInfill. Of course, there are more developments “in the pipeline” than these, but projects that haven’t been made public can be hard to quantify, so we’re not attempting to do so as part of this assessment.

In summary, Downtown Denver is firing on all cylinders. A strong office market fueled by companies moving Downtown for its desirable transit/walkable environment? Check. A strong hotel market driven by booming convention center business and Downtown urban tourism? Check. A steady stream of public and institutional projects reflecting our community’s desire to keep Downtown the civic heart of the city and region? Check. An off-the-charts Downtown multi-family residential market reflecting strong demand for an urban lifestyle? Check. Like all booms, this one will someday come to an end. Hopefully it will be a “soft landing” as they say. For now, however, the sheer magnitude of new infill development in Downtown Denver since 2010 (my rough estimate: $5 billion) is staggering; a sign that we must be doing something right.


Golden Triangle: Kirkland Museum Update #1

You may recall the good news from this past February that Denver’s Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art is planning to move into a new building at 12th and Bannock in the Golden Triangle Museum District, plus physically relocate Vance Kirkland’s original 1911 studio building from its current site at 1311 Pearl Street to the new site and incorporate it into the project. At that time, only a quick concept sketch of the new building was available from Olson Kundig Architects.

For this update, we’re happy to report that the architects have been busy working on the design and there’s now this new rendering to share, courtesy of Olson Kundig and the Kirkland:

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Groundbreaking is scheduled for 2015 with the Kirkland’s new open set to open in 2017.


New Golden Triangle Project: Kirkland Museum

Denver’s Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art is moving from its home in Capitol Hill to a new facility to be built in the city’s burgeoning Golden Triangle Museum District.

The Kirkland is currently located in an easy-to-miss spot at 13th and Pearl. Its new home of 19,000 square feet will be at the northwest corner of W. 12th Avenue and Bannock and will double the museum’s current space and give the museum a higher-profile setting among  its cultural peers. Here’s a Google Earth aerial with the Kirkland’s new location outlined in yellow:

The museum’s new location is across Bannock Street from the Clyfford Still Museum and the Denver Art Museum’s new administrative office building. An ugly surface parking lot and an old structure currently occupy the property. The new museum building will anchor the corner at 12th and Bannock, with a small portion of the site reserved for some off-street parking. Here’s a Google Earth Street View image showing the corner:

The new Kirkland Museum will be designed by Seattle-based Olson Kundig Architects. While the new building itself hasn’t yet been designed, Olson Kundig has prepared the rendering below as a conceptual design for the new structure:

An interesting aspect of the Kirkland Museum project will be the relocation of Vance Kirkland’s original 1911 studio building from its current site at 1311 Pearl Street to the new site on Bannock. The relocated 3,011-square foot Arts & Crafts-style studio will be incorporated onto the northern end of the new Olson Kundig building, providing an intriguing architectural contrast between the two while preserving the artist’s original space as part of the museum’s new home.

Construction on the new Kirkland Museum is anticipated to begin in 2015 with completion in late 2016 or early 2017.


New Golden Triangle Project: Denver Art Museum Offices

When the Denver Art Museum’s Hamilton Building opened in 2006, occupying the east half of the block bounded by W. 13th Avenue, Acoma Plaza, W. 12th Avenue, and Bannock Street, the west half of the block featured nondescript buildings and parking lots—the only exception being the nice historic building at the corner with W. 12th Avenue. In 2012, the Clyfford Still Museum cleaned up the northern half of that side of the block, and now the remaining vacant parcel on the block is being developed. Here’s the site in question:

Recently, the Denver Art Museum began construction on their new 50,000-sf administrative office building that will house 100 museum employees, a research library, and a 9,000-sf storage area for museum collections that will free up space in the museum’s North building for additional exhibit space. The project is designed by local architects Roth Sheppard. Here’s a rendering of the project from the Roth Sheppard website:

The two-story building’s design takes its architectural cues from the Clyfford Still, rather than Libeskind’s Hamilton Building, by taking a minimalist, horizontal approach. The ground floor will feature folded glass panels. Here’s a site photo I took yesterday:

The new building is scheduled to be finished by Spring 2014.


Clyfford Still Museum: Final Update

The next project we will be looking at is the recently completed Clyfford Still Museum. This is a great addition to the Denver Art Museum area and to our Civic Center district. Since this is a completed project I will link all the updates below so you can follow the progress.

Clyfford Still Museum Update

Denver Museum Update

Denver Museum Update #2

Just like the History Colorado Center, they did a great job with the landscaping and making this development very welcoming and pleasing to the eye. There is a lot of abstract art in this area on the lawns and passageways. I am glad they continued this with the Clyfford Still Museum.

 

 

A lot of civic projects have recently completed in this area. Can you guess which one we will be looking at next?


History Colorado Center: Final Update

Since I have started to contribute to DenverInfill about 15 months ago, there were many projects in the works and many updates from then till now. Some of those projects have been completed now and I feel they need that one final update showing the completed product. Today I want to share with you the final update on the History Colorado Center. Below you can follow the legacy from the original announcement on this site..

Announcement and Design

Denver Museum Update

Denver Museum Update #2

Inside the Infill Part 1

Inside the Infill Part 2

And today here are some shots of the completed History Colorado Center. One of the things I noticed about this particular project is the landscaping. They did a very good job integrating the museum at the street level and making it very pleasing to the eye. You can also see the large signs for events and exhibits that are posted for both automotive and foot traffic to see.

 

I never really noticed the broken up glass along 12th Avenue. It definatley adds a unique character and a great modern feel to this development. On the right is the street view from Broadway. It’s hard to tell in this picture but, in the full resolution shot you can see the pedestrians walking down Broadway were looking up at the museum. It is pretty impressive from the grand entrance.

 

I snapped two bonus pictures for you. I have recently discovered that parking garages are great ways to get up to see some great angles of these developments. Broadway at 12th Avenue sure looks different than it did a couple years ago. Can you spot the people on the top floor patio?

 

Throughout the next couple weeks we will be looking at some more projects that have completed as well as some that have just begun. Overall, Denver is building rapidly and as soon as one development finishes, at least one begins.