Eviva Cherokee Final Update

A modern high-rise in the Golden Triangle has been complete for some time now, so it is due for a final update. Eviva Cherokee, an 18-story, 274-unit apartment building took up a large surface parking lot on 13th and Cherokee Street and has had residents moving into the building since the spring.

Let’s start our final update by exploring the back of the project from Bannock Street. The first photo shows the excellent contrast between the recently completed Kirkland Museum in the foreground with great, vibrant, warm colors, and Eviva Cherokee, a modern, blue glass building with cooler tones. As you move around the block, one element becomes apparent, the blank wall podium. Because this project is mid-block, and this being the alley side, any future development can cover up this blank wall.

Eviva Cherokee 12th and Bannock
Eviva Cherokee Along Bannock
Eviva Cherokee on 13th and Bannock

On the Cherokee Street side, Eviva Cherokee is not just a glass box. A white strip of paneling and grey stucco facade in the middle catch the eye and break up any possible monotony. The first floors on the Cherokee Street side are not dedicated to parking as townhomes line the street and ground floor.

Eviva Cherokee at Cherokee and 13th
Eviva Cherokee along Cherokee
Eviva Cherokee along Cherokee

These last two photos show the diversity in architecture that the Golden Triangle features. The two projects shown are only two decades apart yet have drastically different architecture.

Eviva Cherokee 12th and Cherokee
Eviva Cherokee along 12th Street towards Bannock

Welcome to the Golden Triangle and Downtown Denver, Eviva Cherokee!

By | 2017-10-10T12:25:13+00:00 October 9, 2017|Categories: Golden Triangle, Infill, Urban Form|Tags: |6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. James October 10, 2017 at 1:28 am - Reply

    The blue glass and minimalist design fill in a parking lot very well! It comes alive in the sunshine.

  2. John R October 10, 2017 at 7:31 am - Reply

    Yeah, this building looks nice, I like it. What’s the difference between this development and the more traditional “random blocks of colored stucco” ones? Is it price point? Developer?

    • Citizen Kane October 10, 2017 at 11:41 am - Reply

      Budget. The cost to construct a building like this (concrete and steel, with curtain wall) is vastly different from wood framed with stucco. Like tens of millions different.
      The budget of this building is probably 2-3 times that of the wood-framed land yachts around town.

      Also developer. Developers have a niche and comfort zone. Some developers are comfortable with the wood-framed thing because they know it, have done it, and understand it.

      I think as Denver comes to terms with the type of density that will be required here in the coming decades, that you’ll see fewer of the wood-framed (4-5 story) buildings, and more steel/concrete construction (allowing higher density).

  3. Jason October 10, 2017 at 9:19 am - Reply

    Thanks for all the recent updates! This is a nice-looking building.

  4. Bobby Mucho October 10, 2017 at 7:59 pm - Reply

    Mmmm. Another shining beacon of architectural achievement. ರ_ರ

    I’m not complaining about (much needed) infill in the Golden Triangle, but the lack of relative standardization from a design, materials, massing perspective is clearly and absolutely non-existent here. This entire area could be a mixed-use, mid-rise (6-10 stories), highly walkable and densely tree-lined bastion of an urban residential neighborhood; instead, we get grossly bland, glass towers, next to 6 story Mediterranean flats, next to walk-ups, interlaced with single story farm style homes and offices. What happened?

    • Jay October 12, 2017 at 7:56 am - Reply

      free market capitalism happened!

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